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January 22, 2019

Today, Federal Minister of Health, Ginette Petitapas Taylor launched the new Canada’s Food Guide. The new Food Guide takes a modern approach to communicating guidance to consumers, health professionals and policy makers. This first suite of resources includes a document Canada’s Dietary Guidelines for Health Professionals and Policy Makers, as well as a Food Guide Snapshot.

Here’s just a sampling of what’s new in the Food Guide:

1. Positive key messages for Canadians in a modern format. Key messages are: Eat well. Live well. Eat a variety of healthy foods each day. The new Food Guide delivers healthy eating information in a mobile-friendly web application.

2. Beyond food. Healthy eating is more than the foods you eat. The new Food Guide offers advice on what to eat, what not to eat, and how to eat. Tips include cooking more often, eating meals with others, being mindful of your eating habits, enjoying your food, limiting foods high in sodium, sugars or saturated fat, using food labels, and being aware of food marketing.

3. Food groupings instead of food groups. Bye bye rainbow and the four food groups. A healthy meal is comprised of a variety of foods from three key food groupings: vegetables and fruits; whole grains; and protein foods. These foods should be consumed regularly.

4. Proportions not portions. There are no recommended servings to eat or serving sizes of food. A plate snapshot of the Food Guide gives at-a-glance information on what to eat. In the plate snapshot, 1/2 the plate is filled with vegetables and fruits; ¼ of the plate is comprised of whole grain foods; and ¼ of the plate is made up of protein foods.

5. Water is the beverage of choice. To help Canadians stay hydrated without adding calories to the diet, water is recommended. Alcoholic beverages are also flagged as potentially adding calories with little to no nutritive value.

The suite of online resources replaces the old “all-in-one” version of the previous Food Guides. Additional consumer resources are expected to be released later this year.

Want to discover more about how to make the Food Guide work for you and your business?

Save the date for our upcoming webinar on The New Canada’s Food Guide – Tuesday, April 16th, 1-2 pm ET. We’ll share:
• The science and rationale behind Canada’s Food Guide
• A closer look at the recommendations and considerations
• How to apply Canada’s Food Guide to your business plans

Can’t wait? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." style="border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-weight: inherit; margin: 0px; outline: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #a4d244;">Contact us now for an in-house presentation / workshop.

 
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January 18, 2019

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Download this file (Todd Newstead PR Final.doc)Todd Newstead PR Final.doc[ ]234 kB
 
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BOULDER, Colorado—Jan. 3, 2019—Pioneering cannabinoid company Boulder Botanical & Bioscience Laboratory (BBB Labs) is pushing forward in its mission to bring good manufacturing practices and standards to the national hemp products sector by appointing David Gumner as Chief Marketing Officer, a new executive position for the company.

As CMO for Colorado-based BBB Labs, Mr. Gumner is responsible for building foundational marketing capabilities throughout the company and its growing array of hemp-derived products for the health-and-wellness sector. As a specialist in marketing consumer packaged goods (CPG), he brings more than 30 years of experience creating, building, and re-staging powerful, iconic brands for companies and products in North America, South America, Europe and Asia.

“David’s proven ability to build profitable, nationally recognized brands through research and data-driven analysis is exactly the skill set we need to position Boulder Botanical & Bioscience Laboratory for our next level of growth,” said Robert Di Marco, CEO and Chairman of BBB Labs. “With the market for CBD products expanding exponentially, Mr. Gumner is uniquely qualified to establish our brands with wellness-minded consumers across America and beyond.”

Mr. Gumner specializes in strategic marketing and positioning for brands transitioning from niche markets to the mainstream consumer marketplace.

Prior to joining BBB Labs, Mr. Gumner served in marketing leadership roles at Procter & Gamble, Nature’s Way Products, Next Proteins, Metabolife, Whole Foods Market and Kraft Foods. Mr. Gumner also provided consulting services for emerging and growing companies in the health-and-wellness industry, including natural foods, nutrition bars, energy beverages, nutritional supplements, CBD products and natural beauty care.

“Considering the federally approved push to boost hemp production in America, I relish this opportunity to join a stand-up company such as BBB Labs, which has set the standard for domestic hemp product manufacturing,” Mr. Gumner said. “The fact BBB Labs has staked its reputation to good manufacturing practices for its hemp-based products is huge. It’s time for the hemp industry to leave behind its ‘Wild West’ beginnings and join the mainstream.”

For more information or to schedule an interview, please contact Emily Trigg, Publicist at Grasslands, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 318-564-8195.

 
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January 3, 2019

Research suggests that celiac disease could be caused by a bacterial enzyme used to manufacture sausages, cheese, bread and other processed foods.

Myths about gluten are hard to bust. Intolerance, allergy, sensitivity, hypersensitivity. What is what?

Celiac disease is none of these things. It is an autoimmune disorder, where gluten triggers the immune system to attack the gut. It is common, lifelong, and can seriously harm health – but nobody knows for sure what causes it. Now a review in Frontiers in Pediatrics says a common food additive could both cause and trigger these autoimmune attacks, and calls for warnings on food labels pending further tests.

Environment causes celiac disease – but only in susceptible individuals

Gluten-free diets have become popular despite little or no evidence of benefit for most people. But for the 1 in 100 with celiac disease, even a mouthful of bread can trigger an immune response that damages the small intestine, impairing nutrient absorption.

Exactly what causes this autoimmune reaction to gluten – a protein found in wheat, rye and barley – is uncertain. Specific mutations in an important immunity-related gene called HLA-DQ seem to be necessary for developing celiac disease, with one of two HLA-DQ variants present in virtually every sufferer – but insufficient, as these variants are also present in about 30% of the general population.

As a result, myriad environmental factors have proposed to interact with genetic risk to cause celiac disease. These span infections, food and toxins; vaccination, drugs and surgery. Most recently, food additives have been suggested to contribute. Among these, microbial transglutaminase – a bacterial enzyme heavily used in industrial processing of meat, dairy, baked and other food products – has emerged as a likely culprit, according to the new review.

How a food binder could be our undoing

“Microbial transglutaminase can glue together proteins, so it’s used to improve food texture, palatability and shelf-life,” says co-author Aaron Lerner, visiting professor at the Aesku.Kipp Institute in Germany. “This enzyme functions like the transglutaminase produced by our body, which is known to be the target of autoimmunity in celiac disease.”

There is a direct positive correlation between rising use of industrial enzymes in bakery products and rising incidence of celiac disease in the last four decades, according to Lerner and co-author Dr Matthias Torsten of the Aesku.KIPP Institute, Germany. But if transglutaminase is produced normally in our tissues – and by our own gut microbes – what difference should a little more in our diet make?

“This is mostly a question of scale,” argues Lerner. “Our own transglutaminase has a different structure to the microbial sort, which allows its activity to be tightly controlled. And while the relatively indiscriminate microbial transglutaminase is produced by some of our normal gut fauna, the amount of the enzyme could be significantly increased when this microbial population is altered by factors like infection, antibiotics or stress – or, indeed, through consumption of industrially processed foods.”

What links gluten, transglutaminase, HLA-DQ genes and autoimmunity?

Gluten is tough to break down completely. This is useful for helping baked goods to rise and keep their shape, but in celiac sufferers presents a problem – and a possible causal link with microbial transglutaminase.

“The gluten protein fragments or ‘peptides’ that remain after digestion are highly susceptible to transglutaminase, which modifies them to make a variety of new peptides” Lerner explains. “These unusual peptides are particularly likely to resist further breakdown, and to be recognized as ‘foreign’ by HLA-DQ immune receptors inside the gut wall – but only in those carrying the HLA-DQ variants associated with celiac disease.”

Compounding this, components of gluten also loosen the connections between cells lining the gut, allowing more gluten-derived proteins – as well as microbial transglutaminase – to breach this barrier and interact with immune cells.

“Microbial transglutaminase itself could also increase intestinal permeability by directly modifying proteins that hold together the intestinal barrier,” adds Lerner.

Human studies implicate microbial transglutaminase

This all begs the question: if it is gluten-derived proteins that stimulate immune cells in celiac disease, why does the immune response target transglutaminase? And are microbial and human transglutaminase recognized interchangeably by the immune system?

“In one of our own studies, we tested antibodies from the blood of celiac patients. We found that more antibodies were active against complexes of transglutaminase bound to gluten fragments, than against either component alone. The anti-complex antibody count was also the best predictor of intestinal damage in these patients. This was true of both microbial and human transglutaminase complexes, for which there were similar antibody counts.”

In other words, microbial transglutaminase (bound to gluten fragments) could in fact be the target of the immune response in celiac disease – and the attack on our own transglutaminase merely a case of mistaken identity. Microbial transglutaminase present in processed foods is therefore a potential environmental cause of celiac 

disease.

Is microbial transglutaminase safe?

But according to Lerner, the jury is still out.

“Ultimately all we have so far are associations between microbial transglutaminase and celiac disease. To test whether this enzyme causes or triggers immune damage in celiac disease will require experimenting with exposure in animal models, intestinal cell lines or biopsies”.

Nevertheless, with no known cure for celiac disease, treatment depends on preventive measures – namely, adhering to a gluten-free diet.

“Until there is a clearer answer, we recommend transparency and vigilance with regards to labeling of foods processed using microbial transglutaminase.”

In Switzerland for example, it is already a requirement that such products be labelled as unsuitable for persons with celiac disease.

 
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Jonathan Davison, Beverage Analyst at GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company, identifies the defining beverage market trends in 2018:

1. Company diversification:

1.pngResponding to a game-changing shift in consumer attitudes towards health and wellness, carbonated soft drinks giants looked to protect their volume and value sales through category diversification. Delivering on its promise to become a "total beverage company", Coca-Cola led this trend through a wave of acquisitions across multiple industry sectors, as well as revamping the marketing of Diet Coke and Zero Sugar.

The company also expanded into other categories such as dairy alternatives, increased its energy and juice drinks portfolios and made its presence felt in Foodservice with the £3.9bn acquisition of Costa Coffee.

2. Combatting packaging waste:
2.pngThe strength of consumer demand for sustainable packaging solutions is driven by industry collaboration and company innovation.

Over 106 brands signed up to the UK's 'Plastic Pact', while PepsiCo joined Nestle, Danone and Origin Materials in the NaturALL Bottle Alliance. When asked about the effect of a tax on plastic products, *79% of global consumers indicated their shopping behaviour would change. In the UK, Government and industry have reflected this sentiment in a number of actions this year.

The Gov’t continues its consultation on a UK wide deposit return scheme (DSR) for drinks containers. Starbucks introduced a 'latte levy' of 5p on single-use paper cups, Carlsberg launched its pioneering 'snap packs' solution to bond packs of multiple cans together without using plastic rings and a number of resealable and recyclable can innovations have been launched. 

3. Cannabis-infused drinks:
3.pngFunctional beverages continue to play an important role in the beverages market with the perceived health benefits of cannabidiol (CBD) driving a surge of interest amongst young consumers in 2018.  
 

This emerging sub-category has caught the attention of the biggest players in the market. Constellation Brands and Molson Coors made significant investments in August and both Coca-Cola and PepsiCo are keeping a watching brief on developments.

4. Blossoming plant-based sub-category:
4.pngVegans and vegetarians make up just *7% of the world's population so it is significant that attitudes to plant-based drinks from non-vegetarians shifted markedly in 2018, as the multi-layered benefits of these drinks became more apparent. The growing consumer interest in this sub-category has taken it mainstream, with market volumes set to increase by **5% in 2018.

Key developments in 2018 included Coca-Cola’s relaunch of its dairy-free smoothie brand AdeZ and the introduction of a range of plant-based milks under its Innocent brand, together with new launches from Starbucks and PepsiCo. 

5. Individualism and self-tailoring:
5.pngGlobalData's latest report, ‘‘TrendSights Overview: Individualism & Expression - Exploring the impact the Individualism & Expression mega-trend has on innovation across the FMCG space,2018, reveals thatconsumers are looking for more bespoke, individual experiences, with 61% of global consumers expressing an interest in creating their own products.

In the crisps market, Walkers’ ‘Salt 'n' Shake’ provides a good example of how well this concept can work and some soft drinks brands are now including similar options for customization. Kolibri Drinks launched of a range of botanical products this year which allow consumers to tailor the flavour and sugar content themselves, by using a syrup-based sweetener stored in the cap. This concept could be widely adopted by ready-to-drink (RTD) formats, providing consumers with more choice by offering customisation with convenience.

 

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